#FabDigital


53123679 - business people meeting corporate digital device connection concept

Each of us has the power to make change happen…. or at least that’s how we look at it.  Small acts together can make big changes and if we volunteer to do them they have a great sticking power.

So what could we change? We embrace digital in most aspects of our lives. We talk to our family and friends, shop, arrange our travel, find our recipes for meal planning and order taxis.  How do you feel when your battery runs down on your phone? Disconnected? Unable to do stuff ?  Frustrated?  The tools we use to live our modern lives are woven through them like invisible strands.

Yet in healthcare it often feels like a history tour; we are transported back in time. The Nuffield Trust report published earlier this year tells us on average NHS organisations are a decade behind.  Think of all the opportunity we are missing to deliver better care!

It’s easy to overlook existing digital tools as part of new ways of doing things in health and care; maybe because in everyday life for many of us it is so invisible and integrated, unless it goes wrong we pay it little attention – so how do we change that and make it a more obvious part of the future? I don’t believe it’s about politicians or indeed policy it’s about people and that’s you and me.

How about if everyone made a pledge to do something ‘digital’ would that be a start? Just think what might happen if we then also encouraged our colleagues and family and friends to do the same.  The leadership of change often takes a group of focused people who create a tipping point that starts a process of change.  It often takes ‘doing’ rather than ‘talking’ so perhaps we could start some of the ‘doing’?

lightbulbSimple acts such as all of us committing to learn a new digital skill, for example, tackling that tricky process online that you have been avoiding, or learning how to order your own repeat prescriptions online.  You could also do something digital to improve your own health such as download a new app to check your weight, ask for access to your GP record or use the NHS Choices Couch to 5K App – or persuade your partner to do the same.  Or it could be helping your parents to work out how to get access to their health record with their GP.  If you work in health, find out what is happening around digital and commit to help and support the substantial changes we need to make. Go and meet the people who work in your information department or the technology team as part of a #RCT – ask them what they do and how they can help you to deliver care. Look at how you can use the technology you already have to contribute to doing things differently – perhaps show patients resources online that they can look at in their own time or link them to online peer networks. What would you expect if you were a patient in 2016? If you don’t work in health but you are a patient, carer or service user ask the people who help you how digital might be able to help you….

In the NHS we depend on incredible people and there are 1.2 million of us. Just imagine the impact we could make with a million digital pledges.  The fact is the staff in the NHS are the best resource we have; if we all mobilised behind the digital age it would make a real difference.

If you think this is useless/pointless have a look and be inspired by the work of the Tinder Foundation and some of the digital heros in the video:

fab-change-dayIf you want to make a digital pledge tell us about it on Twitter using #FabDigital and register your pledge on the FAB Change Day App:

A modern NHS should be digital – what part can you play?

Let us know what you do and what you think!

Deborah El-Sayed @debselsayed

Anne Cooper @anniecoops

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.

Margaret Mead

 

Social media and me


Private_Professional_SoMeFilmStillI think I joined Facebook in 2007; not exactly an early adopter but not a late-comer either. I can remember who sent me the link and why she said I would like it. She was right I did! Before that I was a user of ‘Friends Reunited’ too – you remember that? Where you could look people up from school? I became a Facebook fan and, as smart phones came into my life and I spent increasing amounts of time travelling with my phone in my hand, social media an increasingly important part of my personal life.

A little while later, in 2009, someone at work suggested I join Twitter. I am always curious about new things so I duly logged in and created my account – @anniecoops was born.

In February 2009, when I started my Twitter journey, I took ages to warm up. Like many people who I speak to I didn’t really ‘get’ it and after around 3 months of trying I gave up. Here is my illuminating first tweet :0) first tweet 1 (2)

I can’t remember what made me go back but after those 3 months but I suspect it was a challenge from someone who probably said ‘If you don’t get it, you are probably not trying hard enough’ and I absolutely can’t resist a challenge like that! I met some important friends along the way and by April 2015 I find that I have tweeted 74K times and now have 8600 followers. With the launch of a social media film that I have worked on with @NHSIQ I thought it was time to reflect on that journey and what has happened.

Here is a link to the film

annieAnnie was never my name, I always thought it was a bit twee for me, more of a nice girl name rather than the firm, straight and solid name Anne. I always say Anne is a good name, you can’t shorten it and it’s hard to mess with but I had no idea how ‘Annie’ was going to become part of my life. I had been called ‘Coops’ at work for quite a while and my son in the Cadets was called the same. When I tried to register @annecoops it was gone as was @annecooper. The addition of the ‘i’ to my first name was simply a pragmatic thing to do. I had no idea what was going to happen and that, by 2015, more people at work would call me Annie than Anne!

Facebook_BackyardFence_SoMeFilmStillMy social media journey has been a great addition to my professional life. Later in September 2012 started my wordpress blog and I re-discovered my love of reflecting through writing. By then AnnieCoops had taken hold as my ‘brand’ and also became the name of my blog.

I completely accept that social media is not for everyone – I dislike those who behave as zealots trying to pressurise people into using social media, particularly Twitter. It’s not for everyone but quite often there will be a platform that works for most people – I know lots of people who love Pinterest for example but I personally don’t get it as I clearly prefer the words and feelings that blogs evoke for me. I love Blipfoto as well but I am too ill-disciplined to be properly focussed on trying to improve my photography skills.

Social Media has been a positive experience for me and I thought it might be helpful to say why:

  • Professional inclusion

Working in informatics is hard. It’s like the geek club and most of the time I don’t actually belong in it – I’m tolerated and valued but not quite part of it either. Additionally in nursing informatics still feels peripheral. Back in 2009 I didn’t really think I was part of nursing, I had the sense, rightly or wrongly, that people didn’t really get the digital agenda and as a result I wasn’t really part of the nursing ‘family’ – I was labelled a geek* and therefore not part of where the nursing action was. Twitter changed that for me, I started to talk to other nurses and soon established a new network where I felt like I belonged and I continue to feel part of that family. It has given me a real opportunity to feel professionally re-connected and valued and to re-profile myself as more than the perceived ‘geek’.

  • Creating bridges

BridgesSocial Media has been great for me in making connections and creating bridges to new spaces. New spaces I have been given a glimpse into include connecting with more professionals including doctors, midwives, pharmacists, medical educators, people who working in housing and local government, the voluntary sector, leadership development, organisational development, education – the list is so long I can’t list everyone and I value all those connections more than I can explain. It has given my personal and professional life a greater breadth and depth that would not have been possible without social media. I value the eclectic nature of my connections and social media friends.

  • Being a patient

Being a professional who happens to have a long term condition like T1 Diabetes can be a challenge. I think for many years most of the time I ignored it. Social Media allowed me to not only find a Diabetes family but also to try to add value to that community. I have enjoyed blogging about my condition and also sharing via Twitter some of the ups and downs. I have tried to help others too and to share my expertise as a patient. I wish I had found this opportunity earlier in my life.

  • Access to resources and expertise

One of the very best things about Twitter is the generosity of the people I connect to. I have learnt more in the last few years about so many things and I believe that this is likely to make me a better professional but also a better person. Sharing is not just the technical stuff but thoughts feelings and emotions that help me to understand in a deeper way – it’s a better learning space than any lecture I have ever had at university.

* there is nothing wrong with being a geek it’s just that I’m not one by this definition: ‘”someone who is interested in a subject (usually intellectual or complex) for its own sake”social media film

You never know!


conferenceI am sitting in a large conference room and a senior nurse is presenting at the front of the room. I know her face but I just can’t place her. I just assume I have seen her on my long conference circuit – I meet so many people these days I find it impossible to remember everyone – but my capacity to remember faces hasn’t gone away, so inevitably these day I often start conversations by saying ‘I know you, don’t I?…..’

Yesterday, I’m standing at the coffee station at another event and a nurse comes over to me and says I just wanted to say ‘hello’, I’m from this Trust and you came to speak to us and I’ve done this since then’.

Another day, I’m waiting in line in the loo (there is always a queue in the ladies and I’ve never been one of those women who is confident enough to dive into the men’s) and a lady comes up to me and says – ‘I just needed to say hello and tell you what happened. You made me realise that I had a passion for informatics, that my organisation at the time couldn’t give me the role I needed to feel fulfilled and now I have a new job in a new organisation where I love it!’ She was beaming.

ward sisterThe first of these examples culminated in the lady coming over to me at the end and saying ‘You are Anne Cooper aren’t you?’ She had been a student, and then newly qualified staff nurse, when I was a ward sister. For some reason, work related, 25 years ago, I had invited her to my home. She remembered it; she could recall my first little marital house and exactly where she had parked. I started to remember her a little. She told me that I had been ‘inspirational’, that I was doing all sorts of things (sounds like me I guess) and she had remembered me from all those years ago. Then we jointly reminisced about the good old days and our shared experiences; it was a good conversation.  The photo is of me at almost exactly that time.  The hospital that I loved no longer exists – its an Asda and a housing estate now – how time flies!

roffeyNow, words like inspirational make me squirm a little. It seems so ethereal, so non-specific and hard to pin down….. this post isn’t about that. It’s about impact and role modelling.

I wrote a post a while ago – you can see it here – about how we tend to focus on people we can role model from and less on how we, ourselves, are role models and what this means.

These conversations I have had this week bring me back to that thinking. Sometimes it’s the small things we say and do, that we see as having little consequence, that have a big impact on others. Being a leader is hard. Sometimes feedback takes its time to come back to you – in this case 25 years – but I was proud and humbled when these incredible women took the time to approach me and be so lovely.  It makes me squirm a little but it also makes me feel good that I may have had a positive impact on people.

‘Every moment and every event of every man’s life on earth plants something in his soul’

Thomas Merton

Reflections from me:

  • Try to be your very best with others all the time, be a positive role model, as you don’t know the lasting impact you are having.
  • If someone has done something that is important to you tell them! That matters too!

lead by example

‘Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds you plant’

Robert Louis Stevenson