#LanguageMatters


By Rosie Walker, Successful Diabetes and Anne.

DiabetesWe have both attended diabetes professional conferences and reflected on the language used about diabetes, for example, self-care is often labelled with words like ‘compliance’, patients are ‘suffering from diabetes’ and ‘poor’ is contrasted with ‘good’ control. These words carry a degree of stigma, or at the very least affect how people interact with those of us who have diabetes.   I have also blogged previously about the use of labels and stigma (check out #LabelsR4JamJars).

In other countries, most notably Australia, there has been a push to change the way language is used and Diabetes Australia have led the way in trying to eradicate words that are unhelpful when supporting people to live with diabetes and suggesting others. Their position statement ‘A new language for diabetes’ was drawn up by an eminent working group including clinicians, psychologists and of course, people living with diabetes. It is the basis for many events and presentations which quite literally ‘spread the word’ about language awareness and use in diabetes care. One such presentation was recently at the American Diabetes Association 2017 meeting in San Diego, where it was proposed that the USA might develop its own statement.

Inspired by attending that workshop and/or hearing about it through Australian diabetes advocate and blogger, Renza Scibilia, ourselves and Dr Partha Kar, Associate National Clinical Director for Diabetes in England, have decided to do something about this in the UK; working with people with diabetes, and also professionals and voluntary sector organisations, to create a UK statement that raises awareness of and promotes the best use of language in relation to diabetes and people living with it.

To start us off, we would like to hear your views:

What words or phrases do you think should be discouraged from use in referring to people living with diabetes, the management of their condition and/or diabetes care generally? Perhaps you could give us a list of your ‘top 5’ recommendations with alternatives?

To help you get started here is the Australian position statement

Please post your comments in the comments box below (if you would like to remain anonymous please say so in your comment and I will not post it openly on this site but will add your views to the debate).  You can also tweet us @anniecoops @successdiabetes using #Diabeteswords or #languagematters, by the end of July 2017.

You can also comment on other people’s ideas if you wish (politely of course!).

time to listenWe will be putting all the ideas together and will take all comments into account when drafting the statement.  The statement will be developed by a multi-disciplinary group but your voices can be heard.

Please contribute and also share this invitation as widely as you can – we would like to get the views of as many people as possible!

We will also be having a tweet chat on July 25th in the evening with @WeNurses using #WeMDT.  That should be a lively event so please put a place-holder in your diary!

Thank you!
Anne Cooper @anniecoops and Rosie Walker @successdiabetes

anniecoops diabetes

In pursuit of Resilience


It may be that in writing this blog I am cursing myself; I have fingers, toes and legs crossed and am holding on to a piece of good solid wood, all for luck and against sod’s law.  I hope nothing happens to derail me because I wrote this down!

I have spoken at events recently about ‘resilience’ and I have been pondering what it means.  If resilience is important for people with long term conditions to have full lives, where they bounce back from inevitable setbacks, how can we help people to build resilience? or do some people just have it and others not?

One of the meanings of resilience is the ability of something to spring back into its original shape, an elasticity that helps things to retain their form. But I think this is unhelpful when thinking about health or indeed most aspects of life; life events, no matter how positive or negative they are, shape us as people and for many of us leave indelible marks. I think the definition that includes the word ‘adjustment’ is more helpful; after things happen to us, it is our ability to adjust and move on that makes us resilient.

Remember Weebles?  Wobbling but not falling down? See also this brilliant blog from @betabetic about Resilience, Weebles and personal stones.

So, am I a resilient character? I think so. Having reflected, I think it is a learnt behaviour. I was a child of a broken home, although I still had a very happy childhood. The broken home part led to me taking up responsibilities probably beyond what you would expect of a 15 year old; I effectively ran the home and ended up moving out into rented accommodation at 17. I didn’t go on to do further study at 16, leaving school to earn money so I could completely support myself. My reflection is that my learnt behaviour, to be independent and self-sufficient, is an attitude that has continued into by Diabetes life. I have had a few curved balls thrown at me and I doubt that I have reached the point where no more can be lobbed, but I hope my resilience and ability to cope continue (keep those fingers crossed for me).

I am also as stoic as they come, even from Yorkshire. Stoicism is also an interesting word as it relates to endurance and acceptance, without complaint or emotion. I am not saying I don’t complain or get emotional, more that I seem to have a deep acceptance of life events. This leads me to a place where I can be more resilient; I adjust and move on.

So, has Diabetes caused me to face events and situations that require me to be able to adjust but keep focussed on positives and move on? Absolutely, my attitude continues to be that there are many worse things I could have, although it’s tricky and can be rubbish. I am alive and have a good life; I consider myself to be lucky.

So how can we help people to become resilient?

canHow we react when things happen for me is key. I once had my driving licence revoked due to my diabetes. It was a mistake and I did regain it but not for many, many weeks. I was also quite heavily pregnant and still working at a hospital 15 miles away from home. My attitude? Public transport is what I need to do and I quickly learnt how to manage and still get to work. The buses were OK and I learnt to read and gaze at the views as we went on the long tortuous journeys (bus routes are rarely direct). I can still get myself around on public transport unlike my 85-year-old aunt who has never been on a service bus and now can’t drive. I feel sure I would have my walking stick and umbrella and be waiting for the free Sainsbury’s bus – I developed a skill! She choses not to learn to use the buses and complains that she can’t get out and about like she could. Choosing public transport over going off sick or leaving work maybe isn’t a big deal but it demonstrates my attitude.

Electing to react in a positive way to an event is for me the crucial factor. I am not saying I don’t gnash my teeth and wail but I soon move on actively seeking a way of managing past the problem. I can be stroppy, though, as I hate people feeling sorry for me so people saying how terrible it is can sometimes get short sharp words (sorry!).

So we can actively encourage people to focus on finding a way forward. For me my resilience is about taking a very active stance – if something around my Diabetes management is causing real difficulties how can I deal with it?

Can I learn more about it? Can I change my behaviour or how do I get to a better place? How can I find a way forward?

Having an effective network of people who can help me solve problems is also important, despite my independence. I like to talk problems through and it helps if its people who understand. This is how the Diabetes Online Community (#DOC) is helpful to me, a small network of people where I have reasonably strong ties – comrades in arms!  I can seek advice and support from these lovely people in addition to my own family and friends.

Creating peer relationships for people with LTCs might help some people, whether this be in person or online.

47463096 - red hair one month old little kitten in the boxI like having things to look forward to and I feel this increases my resilience; setting goals, however small, helps me get past setbacks and put bad things that happen into an appropriate place in my life. I am a reasonably driven person and I always like to have something else in my life that can counter balance my health. Right now, for example, we are planning my husband’s 60th birthday party, we are determined to make it special and memorable and are having great fun doing so! It doesn’t have to be big grand goals that distract you (there are always cats and kittens).

So how can we help people to set goals and take positive action. What one thing each day will help them feel that they are in control?

I recently spoke to a group of Paediatricians who care for children with Diabetes and this made me reflect.  It seems to me that we might want to protect young people and try to shield them from life events that challenge them but I think it is vital that they find out how they will cope and build and strengthen their personal resilience. Wrapping children in cotton wool when they have to face a lifetime of coping seems to me to be wrong.

There are of course other strategies I could use. I am not particularly good at looking after myself. I work too hard, rarely stopping and I’m not very good at relaxing. I think I need to learn these skills as I get older. I have tried mindfulness but I seem to be too busy to fit it in!!  I need to practice more!

I found this information from the American Psychological Association to be very helpful when reflecting on my own resilience.

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This picture was taken around the time I was diagnosed as having T1 Diabetes

 

 

 

#FabDigital


53123679 - business people meeting corporate digital device connection concept

Each of us has the power to make change happen…. or at least that’s how we look at it.  Small acts together can make big changes and if we volunteer to do them they have a great sticking power.

So what could we change? We embrace digital in most aspects of our lives. We talk to our family and friends, shop, arrange our travel, find our recipes for meal planning and order taxis.  How do you feel when your battery runs down on your phone? Disconnected? Unable to do stuff ?  Frustrated?  The tools we use to live our modern lives are woven through them like invisible strands.

Yet in healthcare it often feels like a history tour; we are transported back in time. The Nuffield Trust report published earlier this year tells us on average NHS organisations are a decade behind.  Think of all the opportunity we are missing to deliver better care!

It’s easy to overlook existing digital tools as part of new ways of doing things in health and care; maybe because in everyday life for many of us it is so invisible and integrated, unless it goes wrong we pay it little attention – so how do we change that and make it a more obvious part of the future? I don’t believe it’s about politicians or indeed policy it’s about people and that’s you and me.

How about if everyone made a pledge to do something ‘digital’ would that be a start? Just think what might happen if we then also encouraged our colleagues and family and friends to do the same.  The leadership of change often takes a group of focused people who create a tipping point that starts a process of change.  It often takes ‘doing’ rather than ‘talking’ so perhaps we could start some of the ‘doing’?

lightbulbSimple acts such as all of us committing to learn a new digital skill, for example, tackling that tricky process online that you have been avoiding, or learning how to order your own repeat prescriptions online.  You could also do something digital to improve your own health such as download a new app to check your weight, ask for access to your GP record or use the NHS Choices Couch to 5K App – or persuade your partner to do the same.  Or it could be helping your parents to work out how to get access to their health record with their GP.  If you work in health, find out what is happening around digital and commit to help and support the substantial changes we need to make. Go and meet the people who work in your information department or the technology team as part of a #RCT – ask them what they do and how they can help you to deliver care. Look at how you can use the technology you already have to contribute to doing things differently – perhaps show patients resources online that they can look at in their own time or link them to online peer networks. What would you expect if you were a patient in 2016? If you don’t work in health but you are a patient, carer or service user ask the people who help you how digital might be able to help you….

In the NHS we depend on incredible people and there are 1.2 million of us. Just imagine the impact we could make with a million digital pledges.  The fact is the staff in the NHS are the best resource we have; if we all mobilised behind the digital age it would make a real difference.

If you think this is useless/pointless have a look and be inspired by the work of the Tinder Foundation and some of the digital heros in the video:

fab-change-dayIf you want to make a digital pledge tell us about it on Twitter using #FabDigital and register your pledge on the FAB Change Day App:

A modern NHS should be digital – what part can you play?

Let us know what you do and what you think!

Deborah El-Sayed @debselsayed

Anne Cooper @anniecoops

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.

Margaret Mead

 

Wondering if we have got it all wrong


A guest blog from a friend.  Its a long one, much longer than my usual, but worth a read. For health care staff listen carefully. For those who have got caught in the care system read to see helpful insights and perhaps feel less alone:

47207829 - blog or diary journal cover with text my story in handwritingThank you to Anne for inviting me to blog as a guest. I write this blog with more than a little encouragement from several people but in particular from Anne. Anne tells me my experience has changed me and there is value in sharing this change of understanding with others.  My blog is written to share my experience from my perspective, the intention is to support understanding and learning. Some of my experience did not match up to my expectations but it is not my intention to cause discomfort or harm to those involved I wish to create learning and change. I have made the decision to remain anonymous in order to maintain the anonymity of my service providers.

So here is my story. How does it feel to have your whole belief system questioned? No, not questioned, that’s way too mild a description – wiped out. Yes, wiped out. Everything I knew about myself, in particular my 28 years of dedication to the nursing profession, suddenly no longer served me. An unexpected cancer diagnosis turned my world upside down. I had a pretty standard life up to then; busy daughter, sister, wife, mum and nurse. I was proud of what I had achieved and felt successful in my career having moved into a more senior position.

At the outset of my career, in the acute setting, my work was aligned to the medical model. I was unaware of any other way. This approach influenced me not only professionally but also as a person; it resulted in me favouring scientific approaches and controlled interventions. This came to fruition through the delivery of my 2 children by caesarean section, both for legitimate medical reasons but inside I was hoping this would be the method of delivery.

Seven years into my career I moved into the community, working in a very different model. A model which sought to educate individuals and develop attitudes which enabled them to take responsibility for their own wellbeing. The focus changed from illness to health and overall wellbeing.  It was my first exposure to the term ‘holistic’.

My career unfolded to promote prevention and empowerment. I have been fortunate to work for much of my time with children and young people. For me, this has created unique opportunities for me to learn how to work in the context of other’s lives. To work to understand what can be the best for that young person in their current circumstances, to see beyond the “patient” and deliver what I considered to be holistic care.

Throughout my time in nursing I have been supported to learn and develop through a range of approaches. The most significant include being exposed to a range of models of health and well-being; working in partnership with colleagues from education. I have learnt about their culture being introduced to motivational interviewing techniques and the maximising independence agenda and participating in an intensive leadership fellowship where I gained an understanding of difference and learnt to value it as well as insight into system leadership. I value and have gained immensely from all opportunities to learn – by far my biggest learning has been through my cancer diagnosis.

Woman aloneEverything I expected a “patient” experience to be seemed absent from my pathway. I was in a place of terror, facing huge overwhelming fear. Facing my own mortality. Wanting to understand every detail. Wanting to question every action. All of a sudden the “patient” was more important than they had ever been. The “patient” was ME, me the daughter, sister, wife, mum and nurse. It felt like cancer was taking over, I was losing my identity. My whole being was disintegrating. I longed to feel the familiarity of my pre-cancer life, but it was not to be. I had a brief encounter with thoughts of suicide until I recognised that it was in fact death I was trying to run from. I desperately reached out to everyone I knew, relatives, colleagues, non NHS practitioners and friends, to whom I am extremely grateful. They have all helped me understand, process, express and work out what I needed to do. They have helped me to represent myself, gain self-belief and understand my self-worth. Ironically the bread and butter of my work with young people.

One of the huge gaps for me in the cancer pathway was/is emotional support. The journey is a very lonely one and the time available in the NHS to offer any emotional support is limited. I developed my own network. I accessed charitable support, luckily for me, one particular provision is commissioned through NHS funds in my area. In my experience The Haven Breast Cancer Charity and The Penny Brohn Centre fulfil some of needs left unaddressed through the cancer pathway. I started to build a team of therapists around me including non NHS practitioners. This was soon after I came to appreciate the NHS pathway only had the capacity to manage symptoms, deal with the lump and any roaming cells. My understanding of holistic was so much broader than this.  Holistic in a physical sense, holistic in an emotional and spiritual sense, holistic in a nutritional sense and holistic in the context of my whole life.

I am very grateful for aspects of the NHS pathway to help sort out what the problem was, and manage the symptoms, in most cases the staff did their very best to give me what the system deems as the right experience. It came as a surprise that this wasn’t what I wanted or needed. I wanted an individualised approach based on me and the system doesn’t easily allow for deviation from a standard. The targets don’t allow it. I now appreciate that targets create inflexibility which seems very ironic when the focus of NHS care is promoted as individualised.

47050307 - hospital corridor and doctor as a blurred defocused background

Some of the challenges/learning I have identified:

  • Having a strong belief in the NHS, being proud of my role and contributions and now feeling conflict with this.
  • Not being informed of any risks associated with any of the investigations it was assumed I would accept.
  • Waiting nearly 2 hours past my appointment time to go into the consultation to receive my results.
  • Being sat down immediately after becoming aware I had cancer to spend what seemed like an age having an anatomy and physiology lesson on the breast. My brain was in total shock and I struggled to concentrate. I sat behind a fixed mask behaving as I thought I should. I wanted to run, run and run and hug my children hard.
  • Following my results having to walk back towards all the patients in the waiting room waiting to go in. Feeling so vulnerable and everyone’s eyes focussing my way. I wished I could leave by the fire exit.
  • Being denied the opportunity to attend the discussion of my case at the multi disciplinary team meeting despite asking. “No decision about me without me”. Being told this was due to confidentiality and time. When I asked who would represent my concerns and expectations, being told the nurse would advocate on my behalf. Not understanding how she could do that when the final reports from investigations were being presented at the meeting and, therefore, I wouldn’t have seen them. I wasn’t sure what my thoughts were without hearing the options so I found it difficult to understand how she could represent me.
  • Being pressured to conform to the target driven time line set by the government. In fact being phoned and asked to attend a consultation with the nurse the same day (Friday) as she called. In response to this I asked if I could attend first thing on the Monday so my husband could be present. The response was that the nurse would have to check with the ‘tracking lady’ (who managed the targets) before agreeing to it, as I might be breaching ‘my timeline’!
  • Not ever hearing any words that gave positivity or hope in my NHS appointments. Feeling doomed.
  • Feeling that some of the different departments seem disconnected from my overall pathway, just a process to produce a report.
  • Being expected to have surgery without any pre-surgery consultation with the chap who holds the knife.
  • Receiving an automated text “don’t forget to attend your appt on….” At this point I wasn’t yet aware what my surgery would be, let alone when it would be, and this text turned out to be the reminder for my surgery.
  • Attending 2 different departments, both needing to insert needles into veins for different reasons. Wondering why this couldn’t all be done in one insertion to half the infection risk.
  • Being supported to develop enough self-worth to realise I was so important that I could take control. Up to that point I had gone with the flow and felt I had to do as I was told.
  • Gaining enough confidence to move provider service. My natural instinct is to be grateful for what you are given and not question it.
  • Being told vitamins and supplements are insignificant. And then recently learning that Public Health England now recommend one of them.
  • Researching information beyond NICE. Wanting to seek information from people who had lived this kind of experience. Understand it from the horse’s mouth not just the worker. You might like to check out the list below for just a few examples of the information I explored
  • 40977303 - illustration of the breast cancer ribbonDeveloping a realisation that my body is my own. And I have the right to decide what happens to it. I agreed to have a wide local excision of the lump.
  • Asking for copies of all my reports and results so I could process the information in line with my capacity to digest it.
  • Feeling completely exhausted with researching and processing information because I believe there is more to disease and wellness than drug based statistics.
  • Feeling intuitively that damaging my immune system through chemotherapy was not the right choice at this time for me. This being reinforced when I asked how much benefit going through chemo would add. I was told that the statistical prediction through the online tool was that chemo would give a 4.6% increased survival rate over 5 years. Wondering why we (the NHS) are prescribing such expensive and toxic courses of treatment based on such low improved outcomes.
  • Gaining an understanding that the impact of stress on the function of your body is key to any potential for recovery. Understanding the evidence in relation to links between emotional and physical wellbeing. Actively utilising strategies to minimise negative thoughts and stress.
  • Receiving letters from the consultants expressing concern at me not taking active treatment, further filling me with fear and stress.
  • An appreciation that a significant part of my contact with the NHS as “patient” creates me stress and anxiety from sitting in the waiting room with people clearly much worse off than myself, to the challenges I felt trying to represent myself in consultations. It is a relief to only have to attend once a year now.
  • Feeling like my contribution to the whole scenario was gate crashing my pathway.
  • Sensing an unintentional arrogance in relation to defining my care plan.
  • Sensing an unintentional arrogance in relation to believing the NHS team was the only valid contribution to my care.
  • 35336005 - health in the palm of your handHaving my “holistic” approach to my care unintentionally undermined.
  • Being bombarded with “think differently” messages in my role and continuing professional development. “Thinking differently” being seen as holding the potential to transform the NHS into something sustainable.
  • Having “question everything” engrained through your very being as part of your professional development. Being encouraged to question why systems operate the way they do, why care is presented as it is, whether we can do anything differently to improve efficiency, safety and/or experience.
  • Realising the extent of influence and bias within medical research. See Ben Goldacre http://www.badscience.net/about-dr-ben-goldacre/ . And presentation by Peter Wilmshirst. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=fLZ0sHOu8dE
  • Learning there is a commercial agenda that may not always be in the best interests of individuals.
  • Learning that some of the things I wanted to include in my wellbeing plan (that were being dismissed by my NHS team) are routinely included in other countries.
  • Learning that the Switzerland Mammogram Programme is being phased out. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1401875#t=article
  • Listening to the BBC radio 4 debate on breast screening http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b049828q
  • Being told your only method of monitoring is mammogram, when it only identified less than half the original tumour (as did MRI and USS). Appreciating the evidence that mammograms are not without risk, but being told there is no evidence they cause harm when I question having one.
  • Appreciating that no one method of monitoring/screening is 100% effective. Learning of many different forms of monitoring, most not acknowledged by the NHS.
  • Learning there is a Political agenda which may not always be in the best interests of individuals.
  • Learning the positive impact of exercise but being disappointed at it never being mentioned during my NHS contact. http://www.ncsi.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/Living-with-and-beyond-2013.pdf (page 9 second point down).
  • Being declined a less risky/damaging USS as follow up because it doesn’t fit with the NICE pathway.
  • Learning how old the NHS Cancer Act is. Considering when we produce academic work anything 3-5 years old is considered old unless highly significant. The Cancer Act is dated 1939.
  • Learning of chemo sensitivity testing for breast cancer. At a cost of £3k individuals can choose to have the sensitivity of their tumour to different chemotherapies tested. The outcome can show some chemotherapies to be more appropriate than others, in some cases it shows that chemotherapy adds no therapeutic value. As a patient I want to know this information to help me make a self-identified choice. I would prefer to avoid the physical and emotional trauma of chemo given a choice. The NHS claim to require cost savings and efficiencies as demand is out weighing capacity. As an NHS worker I want to know why we don’t utilise this test prior to prescribing chemotherapy, to save costs on administering when it may add no therapeutic value and in fact may cause harm.
  • Acknowledging a stark contrast in experience at NHS appointments and non-mainstream support. Gaining feelings of hope, positivity, human connection, control, progress, opportunities and being supported and growing as a whole person from the non-mainstream connections. Looking forward to these appointments which ranged from Reiki, Spiritual Healing, Homeopathy, Occupational Health Counselling, Nutritional Support, Chinese Medicine, energy healing, Yoga and Spiritual Work. All of which are entirely individualised and underpinned by building a relationship and connection with the therapist. This aligned to my values and expectations.
  • Gaining an experiential appreciation that chronic illness is very different from acute where often working with cause and effect supports achieving an excellent outcome. Chronic illness is so much more complex and cannot be effectively addressed with the same approach.
  • As parting words being told that “in my experience people who take an alternative route do not have good outcomes” without any clarification of what defines a good outcome. Feeling the treatment I had undergone was not worthy.
  • Appreciating the NHS team involved in my surgery. They did a fantastic job in relation to the aspects of my holistic plan that they had the skills, experience and capacity to deliver. They were respectful, kind and caring within the context of their training and pathways.
  • Recognising that the relationship with a practitioner is fundamental to achieving a positive outcome. I would increase the 6Cs to 8Cs https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/6c-a5-leaflet.pdf . Continuity and connection are key to success.
  • HopeReinforcement of my belief that life is about art as well as science, process as well as product and quality as well as quantity.
  • Living out the words presented to me at the start of my leadership fellowship “anyone who is not me is different” and appreciating the impact that difference has on experience and outcome.
  • Wondering if we have got it all wrong?

So when, during my nurse training in 1986, I learnt that health was not merely the absence of disease little did I appreciate the significance this would hold for me. I continue to work through the conflict my experience has created. I am a keen ambassador of the NHS, particularly in acute and emergency care I feel we deliver outstanding outcomes. In relation to chronic illness though I feel we have much to learn and should open our hearts and minds to self-identified needs and working in partnership with a range of approaches which support living well, be they medical or alternative. Self-identified benefit is of equal importance to statistical outcomes when I am the patient.

I would like to thank each individual (of which there are too many to list) who has played a part in supporting me since my cancer diagnosis. I value every one of you for the unique part you play in my life.

41900135 - flower

‘Don’t think of all the misery, but of the beauty that still remains’


Anne FrankFor me it feels like it has been a dark couple of weeks. Looking with optimism has led me to look more closely at family, nature and good friends. I think, however, Anne Frank was a wise young woman when she said “I don’t think of all the misery, but of the beauty that still remains’ (The Diary of a Young Girl).

Acting on these words, this blog is dedicated to all those who continue to inspire me and give me hope. What do I mean when I say ‘inspires’?  This is my personal list of reasons people might inspire me:

  • Passion – they are themselves inspired
  • Tenacity – in the face of adversity
  • Imagination – They engage my imagination
  • Optimistic – They make me feel optimistic
  • Togetherness – They make me want to join in
  • Purpose – They work on things that I think matter
  • Moral compass – they have a clear moral compass that they operate from

The list below is not an exhaustive list – there are many people who inspire me  – these were the first examples that came tumbling out:

nightscout

Night Scout – #wearenotwaiting @nightscout

I find the story of Night Scout inspiring because it took the tenacity and togetherness of a group of parents whose children have T1 Diabetes to do this. Can you imagine being told that your child has a serious, potentially life threatening condition? Wouldn’t you want to do as much as you could to help them to secure a healthy and fulfilling life? That’s exactly how I think the parents who set up the Night Scout Foundation must have felt and the system just couldn’t keep up with them.  Waiting for technical solutions that might help takes an age in health systems, decades sometimes. This group of parents decided that #wearenotwaiting and have gone on to develop some technical systems that help the monitoring of blood glucose for children despite of the system. I love their slogan ‘Be Impatient’. I love that they used their collective skills and did it anyway, despite being told, I suspect, they shouldn’t.

Read more about the Night Scout Foundation

The power of community and the drive of wanting to make things better is inspiring.

The Hen Power Project – @equal_arts

Sometimes things are so simple they have a beauty that comes from that very simplicity.  We know that social isolation and loneliness can lead to poor health

Dealing with loneliness is a complex social issue, as my personal experience tells me. This is why I think the Hen Power project is so inspiring. It is creative and optimistic and make me want to join in and indeed one day I might!

The Hen Power project is a project from Equal Arts, a charity in the North East of England. They work with some of the most disadvantaged people who are in their older years.

‘Our work focuses on giving people the opportunity to explore their imagination and live in the moment.’

I defy you to watch this video and not feel inspired!

We Nurses – @agencynurse

wenursesMany of you will know some of the story behind ‘We Nurses’ but I think I am lucky enough to know most of it. I believe Teresa Chinn is the key reason for their success – what is it that so inspires me about Teresa? It is her values. She is focused on community, sharing and collective value, sometimes at her own personal cost. I think she has a clear moral compass that is inherently the reason why We Communities continues to thrive.

Dr Sue Black – @dr_black

SAVINGBLETCHLEYPARKSue inspires me being a feisty and passionate woman. I remember meeting her in London and being inspired by her story about Tech Mums. But not only that then she helps to save Bletchley Park. I won’t try to replay her story here, Sue tells it so much better than me, you can read most of it from her blog.

Sue is a great example of someone with tenacity and determination to do what she thinks matters.

 

Playbox Leeds @emmabearman

tiles

A sample of the lovely tiles the Playbox team created with the community to improve the benches in the park

A shipping container and a whole lot of courage, inspiration and belief in her community is what it took, I suspect, for Emma Bearman to set up Playbox. In an area of Leeds that is less well known than its city centre cousins, Armley now has a great focus for people and play. Emma is like a force of nature and I admire her passion but also how well her projects encourage people to join in. Watching the development of Playbox has been great to see and is a great antidote to much of what the media would lead us to believe was our current society and communities.

 

You can read more about Playbox here and follow Emma on Twitter to be inspired.

Michael Seres @MJSeres

MichaelMichael is another force of nature. I have been following him for quite a number of years now and have been lucky enough to meet him. I won’t try to tell his story here as you can listen for yourself here as part of the Spark the Difference Exhibition (there are also many other stories here that will inspire)

Michael is one of the humblest men I have met but his particular inspiring skill for me is, that despite the odds, he has an air of optimism and hope which makes me feel that things will work out and that all is possible.

This list is not exhaustive by any means and I may write about more people in due course but what inspires each of us seems to be more poignant and potent in darker times than perhaps when the sun shines perfectly down. I hope they help you feel inspired too.

Who and what  inspires you?

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‘Why can’t we do it like Buurtzorg?’


buurtzorg
I was watching the Florence Nightingale Conference 2016 remotely last week and I was delighted to see Jos de Blok., the CEO of Buurtzorg on the platform describing the evolution of Buurtzorg neighbourhood nursing service – he never fails to impress and his charismatic leadership shines through his presentations. As a Florence Nightingale Scholar I was privileged to actually visit Buurtzorg and go out on visits with a nurse and I have blogged about that experience here.

What struck me again last week was the question I keep getting asked – ‘Why can’t we do it like Buurtzorg here in England?’

When we visited the Netherlands I remember someone asking Jos what, in his opinion, was the biggest challenge in the UK to implementing a similar model to Buurtzorg. His response? ‘You are a brownfield site.’

Brownfield is a term used in urban planning to describe land previously used for industrial purposes or some commercial uses. Such land may have been contaminated with hazardous waste or pollution or is feared to be so.

 

For those of you who are unsure what his meaning was the term brownfield site is used in planning terms to refer to a site that has already been developed, in contrast to a greenfield site where there is no existing development.

The same terms are also used in software development and deployment, where the presence of existing systems makes the transfer across to a new system more complex; there are legacy systems to consider and potentially old networks, boxes and wires to deal with moving from old to new.

When Jos set up Buurtzorg he didn’t have to worry about any of those things. He was able to start small and build and set up everything from new. He was able to learn and test the approach as he went along and could make decisions about how fast to develop without dealing with a concern about maintaining a nursing service to existing patients.

derelcit buildingSo the answer to the question ‘Why can’t we do it like Buurtzorg here in England?’ is a complex one. But here are some of the potential answers:

  • We have an existing service to maintain to patients, uninterrupted and maintaining safety – the shift from here to there is seen as too risky;
  • We have an organisational framework where there would be some people whose roles would no longer be required (similar to old boxes and wires). Middle managers don’t exist at Buurtzorg at all;
  • The Buurtzorg model requires executives to cede power to frontline staff and to stop many of the management processes that underpin the way we currently work;
  • It requires high trust and bravery from organisational leaders and commissioners – tearing up existing boxes and wires;
  • It requires nurses to stop seeing the hierarchy as the way to be promoted and to focus on increasing satisfaction through self-development of clinical interests;
  • The Buurtzorg model does not really have specialist roles and nursing seems to have increasingly become specialised in the last decades; Is nursing up for that?
  • Meeting regulatory requirements would be possible in the Buurtzorg model through the use of technology. But who would dare to have an organisation with such a small amount of checking and performance managing?

Just a few of my thoughts. If I had the power though, I would have a go. The experience of visiting with the nurse I spent time with was unforgettable and reinforced for me the reasons why I went in to nursing in the first place – as Jos would say ‘doing what is normal’ and what is ‘common sense’.

You can watch Jos talk about Humanity above Bureaucracy here.  Listen to why he says he started Buurtzorg!

 

 

 

Personal Review of 2015


2015 has been a strange year; at home my other half stopped working, probably for the last time (but never say never is our mantra), meaning that I am the only person at home working! We lost my beloved Henry, our old Ginger boy cat that we had nursed for 3 years through chronic renal failure. I moved back from my secondment at NHS England to the Health and Social Care Information Centre. Of course these are just some of the things that have happened!Anne Rob and SWC black and white

It’s been a strange year of transition and loss but in the tradition of looking back and forwards here are some jewelled highlights:

 

PDDigital unconference and awards

This was definitely a highlight of the year for me. Working with a great group of people, led by the inspirational and stellar Victoria Betton, we put on what felt like a very different type of conference. We were determined to do a different type of event, more open and inclusive, less talking from a mainstage and accessible for attendees from a cost perpective. Our collaborators, all worthy of mention (and some I am still slightly star stuck by) were Mark Brown (@markoneinfour), Michael Seres (@mjseres) Catherine Howe (@curiousc). I think we set out what we wanted to achieve, a new way of including people, not the big, glossy event but one that people enjoyed and felt able to participate in vs being talked at.

The output of the day is here and worth a review:

Fdigitalawards VB, RL, AClushed with the success of the conference we went on to host the unawards a few months later. Stressful and challenging we managed to deliver the events with no cost to anyone at the event but where there was much networking and meeting of minds, connections and chat. The innovations we unearthed are all pretty incredible and the award winner’s worthy.

You can see a summary of what happened here:

Menopause

Back in the spring I blogged about having Diabetes and being menopausal.  It set off a chain of events that led to brilliant connections with a fantastic group of women.  This led to change day connections and some of these publications on Evidently Cochrane. These women are like a force of nature and I love them.  I know that we will all meet properly one day 🙂 Thanks all of you: @drhannahshort @northnatasha @junegirvin @gussiegrips and especially @sarahchpaman30 who tirelessly pulled the blog together.  Its a shame we never made Woman’s Hour but there you go!

The Academy of Fabulous NHS Stuff

[Click the link and look it up if you don’t know it!!]

acad fab awardsOn a similar vein (I would like to think they adopted some of the things they saw at PDDAwards) attending the Academy of Fab NHS Stuff awards was pretty amazing and a highlight of the end of the year. I have never been to an event like this. It was really fabulous but was truly celebratory of many great NHS ideas and solutions. The awards were given based on public voting. I found myself sat on the same table as the fabulous 5 Boroughs Partnership street triage team who won the 5127 Award. If you haven’t read about the awards you should, they are quirky and fun. The 5127 award for example is to recognise:

Absolutely committed. Fiercely determined. Brim-full of self-belief. Refusing to compromise. Dedicated to perfection. The winner of the 5127 award will have demonstrated all of these attributes. 5127 refers to the number of prototypes that Sir James Dyson developed before finally marketing his first Dyson ‘Cyclone’ vacuum cleaner.’

A worthy winning team who were given a toy Dyson Vacuum cleaner as the award. It all made me smile a lot and again made me think about how we ‘do’ awards.  They are in the picture with me above.

Thank you Roy Lilley (@roylilley), Terri Porritt (@gbtpo) and John for not only showing us the way but also inviting me to be there to witness it.

On being a Fellow of the Queens Nursing Institute

qni awards

Professor Viv Bennett (CBE) and me at the awards

In October I received an email from the inspirational (do you see a pattern here – a few inspirational women have crossed my path this year) – Crystal Oldman, CEO at the QNI I was invited to become a Fellow at the QNI. It’s hard to explain why this meant so much to me but here goes:

 

Back in the olden days when I was a student nurse we did community placements and I remember wanting to be a community nurse. I can still remember nursing the lady in Scarborough, at home, with her family, in their tiny house, where I realised this was how it should be. I remember going to the house to turn her every day of my placement. I attended her funeral when she died.

Somehow life got in the way of this nursing being my destiny. I think then, as now quite often, community nursing was not seen as a career for an ambitious young nurse and I was definitely one of those. I don’t regret my subsequent choices – I enjoyed being an acute nurse – but I do wonder what could have been different.

Now in 2015/16, especially having visited Buurtzorg in the Netherlands too, I strongly believe that nursing needs to invest its efforts more in community nursing as the way forward. It should be seen (and I hope increasingly is) as a brilliant career choice where we can help to change lives for the better especially in older age.

I am very very proud to be a Fellow of the QNI and I hope to make myself as helpful to this relatively small charity who in my opinion bat well above their weight (in a really good way).

Working in social media

Facebook_BackyardFence_SoMeFilmStillEarlier in the year I was lucky to be able to work with the NHS IQ team to produce a short video about using social media. It was a personal challenge that had been set by Steve Wheeler (@timbuckteeth) when I visited him in Plymouth the year before. Although Steve’s challenge was to do a series of interviews I decided that using another media for sharing was what I wanted to do and thanks to Helen Bevan (@helenbevan) this became a reality in 2015.

You can see the video here:

I was also very proud more recently to be ‘in-print’ with Alison Inglehearn (@mrsgracepoole) – she is another incredible lady. I wanted to publish something that went beyond the social media rah-rah and gave a more honest view of some of the risks of working here. Here is the result with grateful thanks to The Journal of Research in Nursing and in particular Elaine Maxwell (@maxwelle) for believing in us!

http://jrn.sagepub.com/content/20/7/625.full.pdf+html

I also attended the Diabetes UK conference this year as a patient and spoke about using social media.   Speaking there has been an ambition of mine for a long while and it was great fun alongside Alex Silverstein (@alexYLDiabetes), Partha Kar (@Pathakar) Roz Davies (@rozdavies) and Laura Cleverly (@ninjabetic1) – you guys rock :0)

The prezi we used is here

I have continued blogging this year too with 17K views of my sporadic blog. I know that’s not many for some people but I still think it’s pretty awesome!

The arrival of #RoryCat

henry

#Henrycat selfie

Losing Henry, the family cat was a blow, even though I had known he was unwell for such a long time but at the end of March it was time to let him go. He was a great friend and a brilliant member of our family. I didn’t think that the hole he left could be filled and in truth it can’t. But in September I decided that we were a family that should have a cat and as a result of contact with my fab vet we were linked to a local cat rescue, a small and amazing tiny charity who do great work especially with feral cats.

 

Rorycat

#Rorycat

Rory has arrived and is a blessing. Zag is shortly to arrive too. We are #catstaff once again at the Coopers!

 

Looking forward

I’m planning some changes in 2016. I can’t yet say what they are as they feel fragile still but I’m getting more and more confident as the weeks go by. I’m aiming for radical change and trying hard to demonstrate that I do as I do, not just as I say.

Wishing you all a happy, health and successful 2016. My only resolution is to laugh and smile more – I wish that for you too.

Zag cat

Zag due to arrived the week commencing 4th January 2016