Endings and beginnings


It’s been a tough few weeks and I feel sure it’s not quite over yet but I thought it might be better to write this in the middle of it rather than after it, if you know what I mean. I’m talking about endings and beginnings – moving from one job to another.Bridges

When I was at Roffey Park on my OD practitioner programme I fell in love with the Bridges Model of change. What is it that I love? I love the humanistic approach that it takes and how it almost ignores mechanistic approaches to change, placing a greater emphasis on how people react and eventually embrace change. I have been going through a change process and I think had people focussed on Bridges it could have been a whole lot less painful!

Bridges says there are 3 phases of change:

  1. Ending, losing and letting go
  2. The neutral zone
  3. The new beginning

Firstly I think good endings are important. They represent the chance to reflect back and unpick what has happened, good and bad, but importantly to celebrate achievements, to say thanks and to celebrate the moving on. Never leave people to go without acknowledging they played a part in whatever happened and say good luck. Marking the end for me appears to be important and without that I am left with a residual unpleasant aftertaste. Did anyone know I was even there?!old job new job

The second phase, the neutral zone, can be a scary place. It’s slow, it feels almost relentless, no matter how long or short it is, too slow for those of us who like pace. It’s like a grey middle ground, I am left with feelings of being neither here, nor there, with no sense of belonging. Fortunately for me I am old enough and experienced enough to know it will pass but it doesn’t stop me getting a lump in my throat and feeling tearful – it in other words it brings out less than the best in me.

So good beginnings, how can we do this? Create positive energy and make people feel welcome. Look after them like you would want to be cared for yourself. Look after the practical things to make the transition as easy as possible, for example make sure they have somewhere to sit and can make a drink! Simple things make a difference, no detail will go unnoticed. It’s a time when simple human kindness can help someone feel at home. Other tips include clarity about what will happen next but not too much, give them time to settle and also influence how it goes – no one wants to find themselves with no room for ideas, or manoeuvrability. I think a good beginning can colour and influence what happens next, where loyalties lie and how much of the discretionary effort people might be prepared to give as time moves on.Coffee

So what have I learnt? That we should celebrate endings, that people need support in transition and that good beginnings really matter. Simple messages really – maybe that’s why we forget.

Golden silence


I learnt a lesson years ago about silence, you know, those empty space between words; I learnt that I didn’t need to fill them, that I could be comfortable in deep wells of silence. This week I reflected that I need to practice more.

cropped-northumberland.jpgWhen I did my leadership programme all those years ago we did a much hated exercise called ‘large group’. There was no structure, no agenda, no objective, just us and time. At first I was so uncomfortable I had to speak. I wasn’t the only one. Some of us shuffled and worried and spoke out filling the minutes and noiseless space. After the first couple of times I reflected on mine and others behaviours and decided I would experiment. I became a silent observer and spent my time listening and watching. I proved to myself that not only could I do it, it actually didn’t feel so bad. I know it improved my listening and observing too.

When I feel anxious or stressed I know I am more likely to dive in with words. I go really fast and have a reputation for being able to talk for England. This week a couple of things happened that made me think I perhaps need to practice silence more.

GoodMorningToAll_1893_songThe first was a great session by @heatherhenry. She talked about how to engage in communities and about giving people space and time, about not barging in with (probably the wrong) answers. She made me smile and gave me a tool for practice – she told us that if you want to be sure you have given someone time to answer, sing a whole chorus of Happy Birthday in your head – that’s just the right amount of time. I’m practicing and although it feels like a long time in my head it doesn’t seem to raise any eyebrows and actually people may well have told me things that they wouldn’t had I not given them time.

time to listenThe second is I spent a great day with a student nurse who is a self-confessed introvert. I reflected that I needed not to talk quite so fast, as, unlike some other colleagues, this conversation couldn’t be like a pacey game of tennis, where I serve the ball and they bounce it back. Perhaps it’s a bit more like golf with quiet walking time between hitting the ball.

Being mindful of silence has always been a positive thing for me but I do need to focus on doing it as my brain darts backwards and forwards and round about and it all tumbles out of my mouth. My son tells me all the time that I ask questions in 3s and it drives him mad – he just says – I can only answer one at a time and which one will it be? :0)

I know that for some people, like me, we are creative when we are bouncing ideas around verbally with others but I respect others right to time and silence. I promise I will continue to try as hard as I can to give people time, careful quiet listening and golden silence.

I had to post this! Silence is golden from the Tremeloes 1967

‘But she’s my friend!’ – the power of making connections


connections 2A while ago I can remember @PaulJthinks encouraging people to follow me on Twitter as I was a hundred or so followers short of 3000. I now have nearing 8000 and I have been reflecting what that really means to me and how I use my valuable network.

There are a number of people who theorise about networks and connections. Metcalfe’s law is one of these, originating with a theory around Ethernet connections and now sometimes used to describe how number of possible cross-connections in a network grow as the square of the people in the network increases. In other words the community value of a network grows as the square of the number of its users increase.

It all sounds a bit technical to me, and a bit theoretical, but I’ve been reflecting on what my network means to me and how my numbers of followers seems to have grown without any deliberate act on my part to make it happen.

I have always been a connector in groups. In my social life I seem to create social groups and then, as they become impossible to manage socially as separate groups (there are just not enough days in a year), I join groups together. It’s not something I set out to do but I recognise that’s what happens; I am often the unique connection in our social groups – they lived next door, or I worked with them, or their children went to the same child-minder or I used to give them a lift to work.

I don’t set out to behave this way. I don’t set out to collect connections or people or friends it just seems to happen – I love people and I am very extrovert, not in the bouncing loud sort of way, at least all the time, but in the wanting to hear about people and share stories and experiences way. The truth is I am much more reserved than people think but this fascination with people makes me seem very extrovert I suspect (a previous blog covers exactly this here).

people connectingSo why am I thinking about networks and connections now? As I have strengthened my professional network with my social media activity I find I am increasingly focussed on how I can connect people together, that the relationship with me is not the most helpful one but that I can act as a sort of lightening rod to others; connecting wonderful people together. It hasn’t always felt this way but as the strength and depth of my social media network has increased I feel more able to do this – my investment in my relationships seems to have made them deeper and stronger. Again not deliberate act but on reflection that’s is probably what has happened.

When I first noticed this behaviour I did have a moment of anxiety. It’s a bit like when you are at school and your best friend wanders off with another friend that you introduced them to and my instinctive response might have been – ‘but she’s MY friend’.

Interestingly that isn’t what happens now and I’m fascinated by how connecting others to each other seems to step up the power in my network!  I have no idea how I got to 250 followers let alone near 8000 – it just seemed to happen but I do know I definitely feel connected to more great people.

lighteningIn the NHS today it feels more fragmented than ever before. Organisations seem less likely to share than in the past and networks that existed across Strategic Health Authorities for example feel like they have fallen away. I think that if we all behaved as active ‘connectors’ it might just power us up a little bit and we might even find that we become turbo charged if we connect beyond our usual networks; I personally love the fact I have connections in social care, housing, voluntary sector, who work for themselves, who work in the NHS – the list goes on. I don’t know exactly how it happened but I am glad it did and there is nothing more satisfying that making a successful introduction then watching some magic happen! I love my network and seeing it help me to help others through acting as a connector is doubly satisfying – even if there is a little demon on my shoulder saying ‘don’t forget to keep loving me too will you?’

Could you be a better connector? I’m going to keep trying.

The ‘big M’ – more taboo subjects #changethechange


It’s taken me a while to get my blogging mojo back. I’ve not been great you see; back in late November I was struggling with staying well – diabetes related – and had a couple of weeks where I am sure most normal people wouldn’t have worked. But I soldiered on. You see for decades that is what I have done. I have, in the Cooper family way, ‘Just got on with it’. What I find, at 51, is that it’s not quite as easy as it used to be. This has all been coupled with something else that has really been worrying me. I just can’t remember things like I used to. These two things together gave me a real sense of being out of control. Why did I feel so tired? I mean, so tired I felt like I could sleep anywhere. Why couldn’t I seem to remember one day to the next, let alone what I had promised to do, nor people’s names? Why didn’t I feel on-top of my game?? I finally think I know what is going on (and before someone jumps in and gives me wise advice of course I will be seeing my lovely Dr R in due course)  I think it’s one of those taboo subjects that no one talks about – the Menopause. After I started to feel a bit better in December I was lucky to go out with my friends, all a similar age to me, from book club, for our pre-Christmas ‘do’. They are all my age contemporaries – a GP, nurse, laboratory scientist, careers advisor, hairdresser and housewife come chef. I love them all. I decided to confess how I was feeling. I am so glad I did. ???????????????????????????We had a feisty conversation about aging and memory, about being tired, not sleeping, hot flushes and cold night sweats. It seems I am not the only one. One of my friends described her memory symptoms so vividly that I immediately started to feel better. There followed a long debate about the pros and cons of HRT. I definitely came away feeling more normal and much, much more optimistic. Since then, having had the conversation, I feel so much better and am actively doing things that help me to feel good. I know that is obvious but sometimes I just don’t do it! tabooIt led me to think about why on earth no one has ever even broached the subject of the menopause and diabetes. In fact no one ever seems to talk openly about the menopause…. It just seems to be jokey comments and a nod and a wink. Is this another taboo subject? The ‘big M’?? I looked online and of course the ‘big M’ does affect diabetes – it’s obvious. If you search online it says so; the ‘Big M’ can make you hypoglycaemic or maybe hyperglycaemic or maybe just a bit unpredictably dodgy…. And of course if sleep eludes you that has a habit of messing everything up too. If you wake up feeling a bit sweaty then is that hypo sweaty or just a sweaty episode? Well of course you just don’t know without testing and testing and testing. Ah, the ‘big M’! The other thing I found was that although again we don’t talk much about it, the ‘Big M’ can affect memory and it seems to be well reported by women, even if it never seems to be discussed openly. I found various pieces of information but this is the most insightful – a healthtalk resource where women talk about their experience – worth a look. menopauseYou need to understand, I don’t do this sort of messing around in my life! I ‘just get on with it’ and I don’t want to think that the ‘big M’ is getting in my way. Information about what is probably happening to me, along with the shared conversation with my lovely friends, made me feel better. I suppose it’s just another thing like Diabetes, a new visitor in my life, the ‘big M’. My experience over the last month just reinforced for me how important open conversations are and the importance of good quality information. I just wish someone had told me about the ‘big M’ before now. Oh, and I forgot to talk about weight didn’t I?!!? Oh forget that. Lets ignore that! I feel better now and on top of things again. I really wish these were not conversations that make me feel slightly uncomfortable, after all the ‘big M’ happens to many, many people. Why is it that it feels so taboo?

Post script: This blog led me to a group of wonderful women who are determined to change the conversations we have about Menopause and the evidence we have for care about menopause.  To find out more search #changethechange on Twitter

image

Hen Replacement Therapy HRT – thank you June Girvin 🙂

anne 25

Who knew? Me 25 years ago 🙂 No ‘big M’ here 😀

Storytelling, tacit knowledge and a leadership Indaba


“If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten.”

Rudyard Kipling

Stories matter; everyone seems to be taking on board storytelling – is it a fashion, a fad?

Storytelling bookHuman beings have been telling stories, transferring knowledge, values and history through hundreds of years and generations of tribes. Attention seems to be turning back to our delight in oral histories and stories. Even in electronic forms we see videos and read wonderful blogs that continue the ancient tradition of storytelling through generations, transferring some of our oral traditions to new digital media. It makes me glad – I enjoy stories and they make me laugh and sometimes cry – and I have learnt so much from these stories – they expand my mind.

My personal experiences tell me that stories are a powerful way for me to share my stories, find meaning and knowledge in what I know, that they have a power that charts and sterile traditional business words sometimes miss. My blog has become a place where I try to share stories and in doing so try to unearth some of my tacit knowledge that I wonder if has any value in the world. My stories and reflections are part of my endeavour to share and to move from ‘stuff that is in my head’ to sense making, making it social, transferring and transforming thoughts to a deeper understanding.

Tacit knowledge is deeply personal and hard to extract and measure. It flies in the face of much scientific study and is known to be hard to draw out and share. The spoken and written word, gestures and emotions are in my view part of its transfer and the recipient of it needs to be able to listen, watch and actively participate in the story to sense-make, participate and share.

It is also my view that it is a social activity for many, but perhaps not all; marrying together story tellers and listeners in networks creates a more fertile space for the development of concepts, ideas and taps into our imagination to assess possibilities and create new ‘castles in the air’. I understand that scientific enquiry is vital in our world but I believe that stories allow us to share and interpret experiences in a way that complements our more logical and scientific understanding.

This week I attended a Leadership Indaba.

Indaba is a South African word, with its origins meaning ‘gathering’ or ‘meeting’. More recently they are styled as conferences where there is space for creative thinking and where story telling is likely to have a strong role.

So this week a group of people with an interest in leadership gathered in Leeds as part of an Indaba organised by Centre for Innovation in Health Management in Leeds. The Indaba has an international flavour with colleagues from South Africa and the Netherlands – a great opportunity for story-telling across different cultures and experiences, a chance to collide our experiences and stories together in a way that creates new meaning informed by the people in the groups.

Everyone has a storySo, I went to the day thinking I knew nothing, I knew no theories, and that I may not be able to participate – that I might not be up to the task (Imposter syndrome at its most active). But Indabas are not styled that way…. Story-telling is what I think they are about. I came away bursting with stories and new ideas taken and processed alongside stories from others. It was a social activity, sharing stories, processing meaning and this was just the very first day we had met. I know not everyone was comfortable with the unstructured social nature of the day but I found it liberating. Telling stories links us to emotions that create new ways of thinking and behaving; maybe a creative way to find new and different solutions to complex problems?

So what happened at the Indaba? Storytelling started the process of weaving us together and started us on a new journey. For me it was, and remains, exciting; the chance to hear others talk about their experiences and to weave those stories through mine to create new understanding and meaning. Its early days, we are still building trust and confidence and we also need to work out how we share this learning more widely – I will blog more as our journey unfolds.

Finally, I think that there is a risk in having a single internal story. In this wonderful Tedtalk by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie she explains about the danger of a single story. If you don’t think that storytelling and sharing is important watch the video – it may just change your mind.

Diabetes paraphernalia


IMG_3184This is an experiment inspired by the brave and lovely Charlotte (@bipolarblogger) but also to push myself to try new things.

Charlotte did a vlog to ‘show and tell’ all her medication for a week.  It was fascinating and helped me to understand.

So mine is a vlog to show you all the ‘stuff’ I use to manage my diabetes in a week. This is my personal list, everyone has their own approaches, favourites and tricks.  These are mine and mine alone.

Let me know what you think in the comments box :0)

PS I have learnt more than I needed/intended to know (ever) about video files, their size and how to compress them – #learningexperience

 

 

‘You don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone’


Dr R waves a filament triumphantly at me; ‘Ah, he says, we are normal’!

My feetBut I know the truth, I may have passed the filament test and in Dr R’s eyes be ‘low risk’ but my feet are far from normal, in fact they feel odd. I just know there has been a change and it’s not a good feeling. They use a filament, a small, thin, soft piece of plastic, to test sensation on the feet of people who have diabetes. ‘Can you feel that?’ is their phrase. Over the last 5 years or so I have noticed a real difference in my feet. I can’t always feel sensations like I once could and they get sore and give me a terrible burning sensation if I walk a few miles – I suspect its neuropathic pain. It’s not so bad that I need to do anything in particular but I know it’s not as it was – I think I have early sensory neuropathy.

I’ve had type 1 diabetes for more than 30 years, to be precise 34 years and 9 months. I’m well and although not as fit as I would like to be I’m active and doing OK. The trouble is I also know it’s a bit like walking a tightrope; diabetes can just nudge you off balance at any time for no seemingly rational reason.

My feet 2012 in Italy

My feet 2012 in Italy

Feet are funny but massively important parts of you. I seem to have hypersensitive feet; it’s always been a thing that irritates me that I can’t wear the beautiful toe post sandals. I just can’t tolerate the bit between my toes. On the plus side I am not, and have never been, a smoker and I do look after my feet, they are treated to lovely foot cream at bedtime almost every day and I am very careful these days about being barefoot (although I still do it, I mean, after all you need to feel the sand between your toes).

A diabetic foot is what it’s called – not the toe post sandals part, that’s just me – but the risk that people with diabetes have, the risk of complications of ulcers that don’t heal and amputations. You are warned about the risks; your feet are precious and the risks are related to good control. However, beyond 50 years of having diabetes of the so called ‘medallists’ only 39% of people are free of problems with their feet – yep that’s right: 6 in 10 people had some symptoms of neuropathy according to the study by Sun et al (2011). (Great study by the way – if you are interested in what happens to people with diabetes over time but not for the faint hearted with diabetes). I think that’s a lot. At clinic they risk assess you against criteria a little bit like this.

But that’s all well and good.

I am 51 and not 101.

I want to wear fashionable and sexy shoes – that usually means heels.

There is not a healthcare professional in the land who thinks that is OK; I have been advised to wear ‘sensible’ shoes. I rebel and I refuse. My wardrobe is full of suitably unsuitable shoes……

flat pumpsBut this summer has proved different. It is with sadness that I report that I feel myself slipping into the comfortable shoes abyss – I even bought some wide shoes this week; it makes me sad.  Here they are my little (wide) black walking pumps.

I know that many people have issues with their feet and for many different reasons and I empathise. My compromise solution is to wear comfort for walking and heels for all else. So if you see me slipping on a pair of wide pumps you know why – I’m walking somewhere and trying to keep my fitbit steps up! The truth is I’m a middle aged woman with diabetes who is watching out for her feet. And for all doctors, podiatrists and nurses; please remember we are people who want to express ourselves through our footwear like many other people, give us a break for as long as we can hobble in the shoes!

I will be wearing suitably unsuitable sexy heels for as long as I can 🙂

My favourite suitably unsuitable shoes :)

My favourite suitably unsuitable shoes 🙂

The other thing is, numbers are about other people aren’t they? But the uncomfortable truth is that they are about you and me too.

Footnote: I wrote a blog for the lovely @whoseshoes about my mother in law and her shoes and you can read it here

The title of the blog is from the wonderful song by Joni Mitchell – thank you to Pete, @swelldiabetes for reminding me!

 

 

Exploring New Territories


It was a usual morning with an early start at 6 o’clock to get the train from Wakefield to London. It was all pretty much typical, Costa coffee in hand and sat waiting patiently, shivering, on the station platform, as I always arrive early. As is also usual, I’m filling in those pockets of time with my Twitter feed on my beloved iPhone and I notice that the HSJ were announcing their first ’Social Pioneers’. As I do, I flick it open and the first thing I notice is a lovely picture of the lovely Teresa Chinn. Then as I scrolled down, there I was: gobsmacked – me a ‘Social Pioneer’?

I am passionate about how information empowers. Information can bring independence and create changes and shift in social order. So bringing information to nurses can enable them to improve their practice, see things in new ways, revolutionise and encourage improvement as well as spotlighting where things might not be right. For citizens, information can drive real change, be disruptive in creating new paradigms of systems and behaviours; I think that ‘Patients Like Me’ is one of the best examples I can think of that shows this; have a look at this story to see what I mean:

Frustrated ALS Patients Concoct Their Own Drug’ The Wall Street Journal, April 15th 2012

This powerful very short TedTalk from Stanley McChystal is about how having the confidence to open up information can make significant differences to what happens and illustrates my point too.

 

‘Information is only of value if you give it to the people who can do something with it’ Stanley McChrystal 2014

‘Sharing is power’ Stanley McChystal 2014

So what has this got to do with me being a ‘Social Pioneer’?

In around 2010 I discovered social media. I’m naturally curious and experimental so, curiosity prompted, I wander into social media. Wandering is a good description – I had little knowledge beyond being a Facebook user, no skills and little insight = scary!

What I discovered was a space that I think has huge potential for nurses but also those people who have health needs – it has the power to transform some aspects of how we use information.

What I also discovered amongst the nursing community was a reticence, anxiety and resistance and sometimes all of these things are still present. It frustrates me sometimes that I sense a lack of professional confidence about using social media and experimenting with its potential amongst many nurses. I also discovered people who I now realise are social pioneers, people with long term conditions and experiences of the health system that I started to follow and watch – I was amazed.

I saw the huge untapped potential that I believe social media offers us. Yes, it breaks down boundaries and flattens hierarchies, but it also has the real potential to change the very nature of the power based relationship between systems and people. I also believe it still has untapped public health potential but it has to move beyond broadcasting to achieve the possible.

So in 2010 I decided that one of the things that was needed were some role models in nursing that showed what could be achieved and as no one else (other than a few notable exceptions like Teresa @agencynurse and a few other pioneers) were taking that on, I decided that I would. If I was to show the power of social media I needed to ‘show’ it, not just point at it; doing presentations about social media is one thing but living it is another. So my ambition was to be a good role model for nurses in social media. That’s when the real pioneer journey began. My delight on being identified as a social pioneer was partly to do with feeling that it was evidence that I had, at least partly, achieved some of what I had set out to do.

In my journey I also discovered a very eclectic diabetes community and I am proud to say that I have also been part of that, making I hope, a contribution based largely on my 35 years of living with type 1 diabetes but of course combined with my other skills and knowledge. I have written with another social pioneer – @parthakar (whom I have never met in real life but know that I will 🙂  )  about the use of social media in the professional interface between professionals and patients – this would never have happened without Twitter. Here it is:

‘A New Dawn: the Role of Social media in Diabetes Education’

pionee signpost

Famous signpost with directions to world landmarks in Pioneer Courthouse Square, Portland, Oregon

That’s why the word ‘pioneer’ was the part that gave me the most satisfaction when I read the piece in the Nursing Times and Health Service Journal supplement. I was also cited alongside many people I greatly admire – each has made a unique and significant contribution. I was delighted that the write up picked up some of the very things I was trying so hard to do, rather than just my level of frenetic activity! That’s exactly what I set out to do, to start to chart the new territory of social media for patients and nurses and other people who are part of the big NHS and social care extended family and I hope I am a little part of an enduring story.

FlorenceI also came to realise that being called a ‘pioneer’ gave me great satisfaction for other reasons; I have always taken on roles in leading (and sometime ‘bleeding’) edge environments; complaints management in 1990 (listening to complaints then was not what it is now), NHS Direct, the National Programme for IT and informatics is still, in its own way, pioneering. There is also the point that nursing has a strong history of pioneers like Mary Seacole and Florence Nightingale – fantastic role models.

So on Wednesday I celebrated with a very large piece of cake!

Anne Cooper – ‘Social Pioneer’ – who would have thought it! Now where is the next territory to explore?

So that’s enough about me (a very self-indulgent blog this week AnnieCoops!): A very big thank you to everyone who was kind enough to nominate me (you know who you are), the Nursing Times and Health Service Journal and the lovely judges: Jenni, Andrew, Shaun and Emma. But also I couldn’t be social without conversations and it is those people who increasingly have the confidence to share, debate, support and push conversations in social media that I need to thank. Your conversations, blogs, video blogs inspire me, help me to grow and learn, support me and enable me to see new futures – thank you.

Cake

 

 

My response to NMC and the revised Code


The Nursing and Midwifery Council in the UK is consulting in a second round on ‘The Code: standards, performance and ethics for nurses and midwives’.  This round of consultation follows a 6 month consultation on revalidation and links a revised code to the revalidation process.

The Code is the foundation of good nursing and midwifery practice, and a key tool in safeguarding the health and wellbeing of the public.

Since the last drafting of the Code social media has become an increasingly prevalent part of modern society; not just for nurses but also for the public they serve. As such, I am grateful that there is a reference to social media in the re-drafted code – it is important that the regulator and the professions recognise the emerging need for digital professionalism, that is the need for principles of personal and professional nursing practice to be applied in a digital space.

You can see the draft code here

This blog post contains the consultation feedback I will be offering in relation to point 114 relating to social media.

First of all it is important to point out that the code is also supported by NMC guidelines relating to social media that can be found here:

This is the current draft wording in The Code:

‘114. You must ensure that you use social networking sites and other forms of electronic communication responsibly and in-line with our guidance, in particular by not referring to employers, colleagues or past or current people you have cared for’ (page 19)

Of course the use of social media is also governed by other parts of the code, for example:
Maintain clear professional boundaries (page 7)
Uphold the reputation of your profession (page 8)
Be open and honest and act with integrity (page 8)
You must respect people’s right to confidentiality (page 10)

The main issue that concerns me relating to point 114, and what I consider to be responsible professional digital behaviours, is the draft wording ‘not referring to employers’. I do not see how this is needed as part of the code. Social media platforms often allow professionals to include details of their employer in a profile statement and indeed LinkedIn (a widely used social media platform) allows the use of an on-line CV where past and previous employment is cited. If nurses and midwives are also following the other parts of the code detailed above then the addition of ‘employer’ in this list seems overly restrictive.  I do not understand why nurses and midwives are unable, should they wish to do so, give details of where they work, in an open and transparent society.

I would propose that more appropriate wording could be:

‘You must ensure that you use social networking sites and other forms of electronic communication responsibly and in-line with our guidance, in particular by respecting the confidence of colleagues or past or current people you have cared for’

I would also recommend a subsequent review of the guidelines for use of social media by nurses who are skilled and understand the medium to take account of the emerging use of digital media in supporting patients, for example school nurses who are using Facebook to support young people and the use of social media for providing peer connections for patients with long term conditions.

If you would like to make your voice heard as part of the consultation – whether you be a member of the public or a professional – you can do so here:

These is my personal consultation feedback, as a registrant, and may not be the view of my employer.

social media network